✍️✍️✍️ Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down

Thursday, October 28, 2021 5:08:50 AM

Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down



She was empathic about not making herself sick to throw up Reflection Of Leadership. Stone Bridge Press. Along with the Pediatric Psychiatry Collaboration Paper characters, the emotions are poured at the right moments which are deep and compassionate enough to make Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down feel the sharp sting James Dickeys Poem In The Pocket it. Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down finished the book in a day, and I genuinely interested in Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down story of addiction. Deadline Hollywood.

Jennifer Weiner's 'All Fall Down'

Also, her mom drops this bombshell and it just kind of goes away, what was the point of it? To just show that addiction runs in her family? Also, when she "escapes" rehab to go to her daughter's birthday I found that totally unrealistic. No one notices when she slips away? No one bothers to call? Maybe they don't in those situations, I don't know but I just found the whole scenario just ridiculous. I didn't find the characters of her best friend and husband well developed at all, I just kind of feel they made appearances.

I also don't know why they had her husband maybe having an affair since that storyline wasn't developed or delved into either. I know the book revolved around addiction but I didn't really find a story. Just taking pain pills and then rehab with quips here and there from her daughter who I hate to say but annoyed the shit out of me for the first half of the book. I don't know. I just didn't feel it at all. I guess to make it short I was bored. Plus little things weren't really accurate, like I know you can't call in a script for Oxycontin, like her doctors were doing, it's something you have to pick up in person and take to the pharmacy, stupid little things like that.

I feel like I was just reading someone's story from the NA book. Like Aubrey in her rehab after Allison shared her story her reply was "that's it"? I didn't feel any emotions or character depth at all. I was really disappointed. View all 58 comments. Jun 21, Joni Daniels rated it liked it. I used to love reading Jennifer Weiner books. They were clever, smart, with well developed characters in a well paced story. I keep waiting for THAT author to return. Still a terrific writer, the main character is the same person we've seen before: smug, white, jewish ish - all the culture with none of the religion upper class, condescending, spoiled, whiney, smart, snobby and self-absorbed. She doesn't really have a good relationship with her family, her friends or her husband - though it is I used to love reading Jennifer Weiner books.

She doesn't really have a good relationship with her family, her friends or her husband - though it is easy to understand because they are poorly developed. There is little to like about the main character Allison, so that when she becomes addicted to pills, it's hard to care though you may find yourself eager for her to be caught and get a come-uppance. The middle part of the book is more interesting and although again, the other characters are simplistically developed and there is too much drawn from the Sandra Bullock movie 28 Days, the emotional pull is clearly due to the excellent writing.

The last part of the book feels 'stuck on' and there is less to be curious about because you've probably read things like this before. It reads more like an addendum. There were glimmers of what I liked about how the author writes. It's just gotten old. View all 9 comments. Apr 20, Mandy rated it it was ok. This book didn't live up to other books of Weiner's that I've read. I was so irritated with the main character and wanted to jump in the book and slap her.

This book wasn't horrible but not my favorite from Jennifer. View all 8 comments. May 19, Patrice Hoffman rated it really liked it Shelves: provided-by-netgalley. Weiner has definitely carved out her own space in the "chick-lit" genre that she is probably for many readers, a go-to when they're in need of a book focused primarily on women's issues laced with a little bit of humor. All Fall Down Weiner's latest follows that same formula that has made her so popular and loved by many. Allison Weiss seemingly lives the life anyone would want. A lovely home, a handsome h It's been quite a while since I read and enjoyed my first Jennifer Weiner book Good in Bed.

A lovely home, a handsome husband, and a beautiful daughter. The only problem with this life is that said lovely home is way out of her price range, that handsome husband is very distant, and her beautiful daughter is very "sensitive". As if these problems weren't enough, she's trying to balance home-life, work, an ailing parent, and her addiction to prescription meds without falling off the rails. All her efforts to contain her addiction result in failure. Allison is so sure that she doesn't have a problem. She's not an Addict. Not the woman who is an author of a very successful blog. Not the woman who doesn't "look" like an addict.

Certainly she couldn't be an addict because she lives in a "Mcmansion" in Haverford. How could she possibly be an addict when she hadn't hit rock bottom yet? Allison is a woman that many mother's can relate to. She's trying to make sure her family stays afloat. She begins only using to make it through the difficult times, to escape her daughter's tantrums, or to forget her husband hasn't touched her in months. But her spiral downhill kept me on edge as one pill turns into ten per day. I don't think there's one negative thing I could say about All Fall Down. I simply could not put it down. If I had to choose one thing to dislike, it would have to be how snarky, or above it all, Allison could be at times.

But then again, denial is a beautiful thing, not just the river. Overall, Weiner does what she does best in All Fall Down. She writes about a very real subject, addiction, but doesn't make it completely heartbreaking. All Fall Down proves that addiction can happen to anyone but with the help and support of family, falling off the rails completely will not be an option. View all 18 comments. Aug 07, Ronya rated it it was ok. The cover photo makes no sense. I had no sympathy for the main character. The daughter was a brat.

Too many unresolved mini storylines. There will never be another Good in Bed and I just have to stop believing she has it in her to write one. View all 6 comments. Jun 29, Sarah rated it did not like it. I've read just about every Jennifer Weiner book, and while I have great fondness for Good in Bed and Certain Girls and I do think Jennifer Weiner is probably a really fabulous person, I just can't say I'm an actual fan of her books. They're a little like grocery store birthday cake to me: sounds like a good idea and I have positive memories and associations, but when it gets down to it I just feel barfy after I partake. Maybe I'll skip the next go round and hold off for a higher quality piece of I've read just about every Jennifer Weiner book, and while I have great fondness for Good in Bed and Certain Girls and I do think Jennifer Weiner is probably a really fabulous person, I just can't say I'm an actual fan of her books.

Maybe I'll skip the next go round and hold off for a higher quality piece of dark chocolate literature instead? View all 3 comments. Feb 26, Joy Matteson rated it it was amazing Shelves: pyschotherapy , women-s-fiction , flippin-loved-it. If you've read Jennifer Weiner's books before, expecting hilarious, witty, easy-breezy reading, then this book will be a surprise. Although still trademarked with her sly wit, reading a novel about an upper class woman spiraling into drug addiction is not for the faint of heart. And in many other authors hands, this kind of subject matter easily could become preachy or heavy handed, and it truly is neither. Allison Weiss has a pretty darn good life--a beautiful but high maintenance 5 year old If you've read Jennifer Weiner's books before, expecting hilarious, witty, easy-breezy reading, then this book will be a surprise.

Allison Weiss has a pretty darn good life--a beautiful but high maintenance 5 year old daughter, a husband who adores her but works pretty long hours , and loving parents, even if one of them just got diagnosed with Alzheimer's. When Allison throws her back out at the gym, her doctor prescribes Percocet, and the blissful feeling of relief from life's pressures causes Allison to seek out those same feelings, again and again. I'm recommending this novel because addiction can happen to anyone, but it's rarely told so succinctly and in a relate-able way.

View all 4 comments. Synopsis: Allison Weiss got her happy ending: a handsome husband, an adorable daughter, a job she loves, and the big house in the suburbs. But while waiting in the pediatrician's office, she opens a magazine to a quiz about addiction and starts to wonder: Is a Percocet at the end of the day really different from a glass of wine? She tells herself that the pills help her make it through her days; but what if her increasing drug use, a habit that's becoming expensive and hard to hide, is turning into her biggest problem of all?

Allison Weiss, a regular sub-urban woman, who happens to be the sole breadwinner of her household with her high-pressure-dream-job-as-a-writer, has a distant husband who is who on the brink of losing his job, a super-sensitive daughter and an Alzheimer-stricken father who is losing tiny bit of himself everyday. Now did I make it sound all too sad and pathetic? Maybe, a bit! Okay, so you can vouch for Allison and say that it's okay to end a stressfully-pathetic day with a dose of prescription pills just to take the edge off it.

Yeah, of course! Allison didn't see that coming when one visit to her daughter's doctor changes her perspective on her lifestyle and her steady dose of prescription pills. Pills started coming in when Allison tried to be a perfect mother. Sometimes her day began by popping one or two Vicodin sometimes even four, to get through the morning. She falls deeper when she started borrowing cash from work to order pills from the world wide web. She has several doctors to write her off a teeny-tiny dosage of prescribed pills.

She lies, she falls, she is high all the freaking-time, she crushes yet she believes everything is very sober, normal and mild, and doesn't seem too loud or wild, until the pills become her necessity. Eleven novels later, Weiner is still the best with her brilliant writing style and by portraying a chick-lit novel into something thoroughly enlightening. And like always, this time too I was struck be her writing style which lets me escape to her imperfect worlds.

The narrative is not that catchy, but the one thing that keeps us stick to the book like a drug is Allison and her addiction and how she convinces herself that she is not one among them since whatever she buys or takes are legal. Yes, Allison is like the apple in the pie in this story. From the very first page itself, we get addicted to the book just like Allison gets addicted to her pills. Her evolution from a super-perfect-mom to a pills addict is fantastically featured by the author. With her every fall, we fell with her too. It can be a serious addiction that needs to be controlled. Through Allison's story we see her rise and fall yet with no luck and how an addict first goes through the first stage of denial, and coming out of that denial phase is not an easy journey.

This story is not going to make you smile instead it will provoke your every brain cells to think about it. Other than Allison, every other character from her daughter to her mother to her husband to her friends, every one is given room to grow and evolve, since when an addict falls deep into the illusive worlds of addiction and perfection, they take down everyone around them into their own hellhole. Along with the developing characters, the emotions are poured at the right moments which are deep and compassionate enough to make us feel the sharp sting of it.

Not only it's all blue and sad, the author have layered her plot with humor and funny moments that are surely going to crack you up a few times. Well, the ending was not too perfect like the story, since it kind of was predictable with less intensity. Verdict: A must-read book for every parent in this universe which is heart-breaking yet entertaining. Courtesy: Thanks to the author, Jennifer Weiner's publicist, for giving me an opportunity to read and review this novel.

View all 19 comments. May 30, Carmen Blankenship rated it it was amazing. One of Jennifer Weiner's best books to date. It is a departure from the Rom-Com books she is known for and writes so well. This book deals with the serious and very prevalent problem of pill popping among the middle class women in today's society. I devoured every word. I looked for any embellishments or untruths.

I consider myself a sort of expert in the subject because I went down this road. It all starts with an extra boost of energy and euphoria, allowing you to be super Mom. But it is a ver One of Jennifer Weiner's best books to date. But it is a very slippery slope and quickly you lose ALL control. I loved this book and love how well Jennifer depicted this often taboo topic. Don't worry, you will still get the humor and well drawn characters that Weiner is so well known for. I personally found this novel refreshing and it shows that Jennifer Weiner has solidified her place among the giants in women's fiction. Jun 22, Stephanie rated it it was ok. I've been reading Jennifer Weiner novels since That's when I first discovered "chick lit".

My father had just died, and I was trying to read The Brothers Karamazov, and my brain just couldn't concentrate on Dostoyevsky, but I needed to somehow tune out and find protection from my thoughts during the night which was the worst. Once I got over my grief, I stopped reading chick lit, and went back to other books. But then when I moved I've been reading Jennifer Weiner novels since But then when I moved to California and picked up my first public library card in years, I rediscovered it--especially Weiner. I've since read all of her novels. I can always count on her for a good story that's easy to get caught up in. All Fall Down was no different. I finished the book in a day, and I genuinely interested in Allison's story of addiction.

I did find it hard to be empathetic for her. I do empathize with people who have addictions; it is a disease. But the decisions that led Allison to a place of addiction seemed unbelievably naive for a smart, savvy woman. And, at times, the story didn't ring true for me. A doctor, these days, would prescribe oxycontin over the phone? I was barely prescribed Vicodin after a week-long bout of debilitating pelvic pain. And I would have been more interested to spend time on Allison's life in recovery. Many chapters were dedicated to her downward spiral and after a while, I was cringing , some to rehab, and only a couple out of rehab. What made her daughter be less of a handful?

How did she and her husband recuperate? How can she afford to be in full-time recovery and not work at all? Two stars. That's all I have to give. Dec 17, Theresa rated it liked it. Not Jennifer Weiner's worst novel but certainly not her best either. I had mixed feelings about Allison's addiction to prescription pills. She's a difficult protagonist to root for. She's extremely unlikable, resentful, self-centered, and a huge complainer. But then again, Allison's husband is no bed of roses either very condescending and dismissive.

The writing is solid, but the ending was kind of abrupt. Instead of feeling hopeful of Allison's sobriety, I just felt empty and depressed. Shelves: women-s-fiction-read , chick-lit-choc-lit-read. Whilst the synopsis of this book drew me to it, it seems the execution of it is lacking somewhat. Allison Weiss is struggling in her busy life, she has a young precocious daughter classified as "highly sensitive", a marriage that is showing more cracks than it should, aging parents battling illness and a busy website and blog that puts pressure on her. The solution for Allison? Pills, lots of them. Prescription pills. Vicodin, Oxycontin etc. At first it's all because of a back injury and genuine pain but when Allison keeps going back for more pills and the opiate ladder is being climbed not for physical pain relief but to feel calmer, chilled, relaxed, in control.

She is a middle class woman battling prescription painkiller addiction. Things escalate to the point where Allison is put in rehab, a place she feels she does not belong in, alongside the "real" drug addicts. Note, denial is a hard thing to shift. This book screamed to be brilliant but it fell flat for me. I found Allison's character a bit boring to be honest, her husband I could not connect to at all, and frankly her daughter just plain got on my nerves. In short I felt the characters did not click in this book. Not for me anyway. Look, it's not a terrible read, I was really hoping it was going to get better and ramp up to brilliance at some point but by the time she was in rehab and we had chapters and chapters of rehab life dialogue, both her internal ramblings as well as the external chatter I was just kind of bored really, it was a bit empty of substance.

I thought the first part of the book prior to the rehab centre was a better. It's like a chick-lit book that's tackling a serious subject but the two are not mixing like they should, the chemistry is not quite right. It's one of those books I will forget in a flash and sadly it just was not a great or memorable read for me. I am disappointed too as I did feel the plot had potential to really shine. This one just did not resonate with me, didn't float my boat, ring my bell or anything. Die hard Jennifer Weiner fans may indeed love it but I am not inspired by this to even try another of her novels. I received a copy of this book thanks to the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Dec 09, jv poore rated it really liked it Shelves: family , friendship , no-one-dies-probably.

Jun 25, Vickie rated it it was ok. The reason I gave this novel only two stars was not because of the heavier story line or the way Jennifer Weiner touched on some grittier topics, such as addiction, marriage conflict and aging parents. No one would argue this book delves a bit deeper that the usual summer easy read concept that she has tried to toy with and fight against equally in the past. However I found this particular book very hard to keep my interest.

The writing style is more long winded paragraphs of inner dialogue and The reason I gave this novel only two stars was not because of the heavier story line or the way Jennifer Weiner touched on some grittier topics, such as addiction, marriage conflict and aging parents. The writing style is more long winded paragraphs of inner dialogue and memories versus actual dialogue between two people. I found this to be very tedious and unnecessary in many places. I found myself skipping pages at a time and still keeping up with the plot points.

All in all this was a miss for me, but I will happily continue to read future books by Jennifer Weiner. View 2 comments. Jun 21, Beverly rated it it was ok Shelves: women-s-fiction. Addiction and recovery stories are well covered in novels, memoirs, and movies. The characters, including the narrator, are all superficial. I think Jennifer is trying to show that addiction can destroy middle class people as well as crack whores, but she does it in a boring, women's fiction way, never resonating beyond the immediate needs and emotions of the heroine and her circle Addiction and recovery stories are well covered in novels, memoirs, and movies.

I think Jennifer is trying to show that addiction can destroy middle class people as well as crack whores, but she does it in a boring, women's fiction way, never resonating beyond the immediate needs and emotions of the heroine and her circle. Two stars because it's Jenn Weiner and thus readable. May 13, Terri rated it it was amazing Shelves: 5-star-read , first-reads.

The expected publication date is June 17 I have not read any of Jennifer Weiner's other books however I had certainly heard of her and I have been curious for some time. I was overjoyed when the opportunity arose to read her latest work. I have to say it was truly worth the wait. While an easy read in style it is not an easy read in content. Dealing with the subject of addiction this story weaves a scary tail of drug abuse and the nose dive your life can take when your addiction takes over.

I loved that this look in to addiction was told through an everyday ordinary person. Great family, great job, "mcmansion" in the suburbs. I found it realistic in the fact that addiction does not discriminate and stereotype and it can happen to anyone. I have to admit that there were many times that I wanted to slap Allison and tell her to wake up!

I couldn't believe what she was doing to herself. I guess that is the whole point. Friends and family who are powerless to help and angry because they can't get through. In this sense I found the story realistic, If I was angry I can only imagine what it is like for people who have to live with it. I am not going to detail too much about the story since it has not yet been released and I don't like to include spoilers in my review. I will say that this story really made me think. It is incomprehensible to me what thousands of "Allisons" go through on any given day as they battle with addiction be it alcohol or narcotics.

The lives it touches and the damage it does. When I was younger I thought that everyone had a choice and that this can only happen if you let it. I am older and wiser now and this story dispels that notion and tells it like it is. There is not necessarily always a rock bottom sob story tail behind an addict however regardless of the story there is no less damage. I feel lucky to be introduced to Weiner's work through this story. Without a doubt I will be checking out her other works.

I highly recommend. View 1 comment. Jul 18, Laurie rated it really liked it. I enjoyed the book, although I found there was a little too much moralising. I listened to the audio version of this book and the reader was so outstanding that I rated it 4 stars because of the reader's performance. I think if I had read the book, i would have rated it 3 stars. Aug 02, Kim rated it it was ok Shelves: wheel-a-thon This book is about addiction, pills, and the suburban mom. However, this book, was a HUGE letdown for me. I do have a lot to say about it, it really hit home for me. After that follows the worst two years of my life and my sons life.

It took almost 2 years to get out of that situation, so when I read a book about addiction, it hurts. Most books talk about rosey outlooks, being able to afford a decent rehab, and families coming back together in love and happiness at the end. Totally unrealistic. And I feel deeply about this. So this book, was to me, just absolutely awful. I was bored during this book. I know I shouldn't feel this way about addiction, and that everyone has their own story and pain, and being aggravated that the depth of emotions that occur in the life of an addict and their family, and the characters didn't match up to my own experiences.

I know I shouldn't feel this way about addiction, and that everyone has their own story and pain, and being aggravated that the depth of emotions that occur in the life of an addict and their family, and the characfers didn't match up to my own experiences. Jul 01, Jennifer rated it it was ok. The first third of this book was good. Great, scathing commentary on the middle class, do it all, American delusion. This part of the book explored how hard it is to be a working mother. I immediately hated the husband character, and kept wondering why the protagonist, Allison, did not do more to encourage his participation in their lives.

Center Point Pub. Publication date. September 1, See all details. Next page. Customers who viewed this item also viewed. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. Everything: A Novel. Jennifer Weiner. Big Summer: A Novel. Goodnight Nobody: A Novel. Fly Away Home: A Novel. That Summer: A Novel. What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Don't have a Kindle? Customer reviews. How are ratings calculated? Instead, our system considers things like how recent a review is and if the reviewer bought the item on Amazon. It also analyzes reviews to verify trustworthiness. Top reviews Most recent Top reviews. Top reviews from the United States. There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. I'm a huge Jennifer Weiner fan and I've said that I've read all her books I apparently purchased this, probably back when it was released, and then it was buried.

On the upside, it has been a while since Weiner's last adult novel, so this was kind of like a brand new release to me. This book is not Weiner's usual fare. She deals with addiction, which she had only peripherally touched on in other books. The drug of choice in this book are opiods, which was fascinating. You see, I'm one of those people who have never done drugs, but I've heard and read enough to have kind of an idea of what it might feel like. I have had a bit too much alcohol from time to time, so I do know what that is like.

But I've never understood painkiller addictions. It's not that I don't believe it is a real thing--but I've had things such as Vicodin and Oxycontin after surgeries and So, I just couldn't understand what the appeal was and I wasn't about to start popping pills to find out. Here, Weiner spins such a compelling tale that I could almost feel the highs and lows as Allison goes through them. I also could understand why Allison would turn to pills when the rest of her life was so out of control. Once I picked this book up, I couldn't put it down and, since I read most of it on an airplane, that was not an issue! Weiner's story telling is in top form here. The pacing is perfect to reflect the frenetic life that Allison lives and in speeds up as she begins to spiral.

Allison is a character that I'm sure many readers can relate to. While I don't agree with her choices and I'd like to believe I'd never make them if I were in her shoes , she is still utterly believable. I did have a few nit-picky things--I wish Weiner had fleshed out Allison's husband a bit more. We barely get to know him and I think that if there was more to him, it would only enhance our understanding of Allison. I also felt the last section was a bit bogged down and about twice as long as it could have been.

Still, this was a very satisfying read and I would put it towards the top of Weiner's books. I would recommend this book to just about anyone. How easy is it for an educated, upper-middle-class, successful wife and mother to become an addict? All too easy, and the slope is more than just slippery. It has an elevator!!! Here is the story of likeable, suburban working mom Allison Weiss. She has a difficult but loveable child, her marriage is a bit iffy but not something that can't be fixed, she has the usual worries about her aging parents, and her daily routine is over the top--but not more so than most of today's "I can do it all" mothers. Except Allison can't keep up--not with her impossible expectations of herself, not with the equally impossible demands of the uppity private school her daughter attends; not with the children's birthday parties that are akin to a major wedding; not with the competitive achievements of her wealthy neighbors.

So Allison gets help--in the form of prescribed pain pills that she can rationalize away because "after all, they are a prescription! While falling deeper and deeper into addiction, Allison fools herself I am NOT like addicts; I am a successful working wife and mother! I am educated! I know the pitfalls! This is under control! What is so frightening about this book is that it truly CAN happen to anymore. So, so, easily. And that is the point of this book. It's a warning of sorts, but told with such sympathy and such empathy that any person who has thought longingly of that spare Xanax in the medicine cabinet, or the Percocet left over from a wisdom tooth extraction, or whatever else is hanging around, can react with a twinge of fear.

I haven't read Weiner in a very long time, and I'm glad I came back to her with this outstanding book. Well done! I just finished this wonderful book and I am so impressed with Jennifer Weiner.

The comic "recaps Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down first Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down seasons of Walter White's descent from mild-mannered chemistry teacher to drug kingpin". Deadline Hollywood. To the contrary, Allison is a mother, successful blogger, wife, and Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down also the Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down taker of her two elderly how can i motivate myself to lose weight. The Symbolism In Jessica Weiners All Fall Down series is a landmark of soft science fiction. Retrieved January 11, This one just did not resonate with me, didn't float my boat, ring my bell or anything.

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